Archives For Travels

The places we have visited

I have spent the last several Saturdays giving you a pictorial report of our visit to NYC.  This is finally the last post and is made up of some of my favorite pictures not included in earlier posts.

As usual click on any picture to bring up a larger gallery view.

 

NYC…. The Vendors…

July 19, 2014

This a continuing pictorial post on our visit to New York City recently.  One of the things that got my attention was the number of vendors on the streets selling almost everything. Here are some pictures. Click on any picture to bring up a larger gallery view.

 

 

NYC… Architecture….

July 12, 2014

One of the things that amazed me about my recent three day visit to New York City was the architecture. I have always been fascinated by the myriad of building in this country and NYC is probably the best of the best.  I won’t bore you with more words here.  Instead this post is almost all about the pictures.

Click on any picture to see an expanded gallery view:

 

NYC… People…

July 5, 2014

This is a continuation from last Saturday of my recent visit to New York City.  As I previously mentioned the reason for the trip was to fulfill a bucket list item for my wife.  This Post is about the people..

Here is a little about what Wikipedia says about the city:

New York County is the most densely populated county in the United States, more dense than any individual American city.It is one of the most densely populated areas in the world, with a Census-estimated 2013 population of 1,626,159  living in a land area of 22.96 square miles

For an old Hoosier farm boy that is a lot of people and I think I rubbed elbows with most of them while I was there. :)  I think most of them there were in Time Square on the Saturday night we were there. Everywhere you go there are crowds of people. That is except for the Museum for the City of New York. There weren’t more than a hundred or so in that entire building.  I guess New Yorker aren’t very interested in their history (ha).

One thing I learned from the trip is that I, at least now, have a low tolerance for crowded places. Another thing I learned is that there is no such rule about keeping right as you walk down a sidewalk. It seems to be every person for themselves.

Enough of this talk, let’s get some picture of the people I encountered on our visit.  As usual click on any picture to bring up the expanded gallery:

 

 

NYC…

June 28, 2014

I am going to spend the next few Saturday posts reporting on my recent trip to New York City. It was an enlightening time for me. I learned some things about myself that I didn’t appreciate before.

When we lived in central New Jersey at the end of the last millennium my wife fell in love with Central Park. She has talked about it many times in the almost 15 years since she was last there. She is getting somewhat physically restricted so it was now or never if we were going to re-visit that city.  It is about the only thing in her bucket list so I was determined to make it happen.

We spent two days traveling from our home to there. Knowing that NYC traffic is impossible we took a train in from central New Jersey to Penn Station. It was a two hour trip that we have taken several times. We stayed three days at the DoubleTree Suites looking down from 38 stories onto Times Square.

Now that I have set up the scene for the next few posts it is time to do a gallery of pictures. More words and thoughts next Saturday. More pictures and stories next week. Click on any picture to see an expanded gallery…

 

Shaker Village…

May 17, 2014

2014-02-23_11-30-18Pleasant Hill is one of my favorite living history sites. I have been there probably a dozen time and stayed overnight in one of the restored common dwelling building on four or five occasions.  I am just fascinated with religious communities of the past. I seek them out whenever we travel. Pleasant Hill is located near Lexington Kentucky. It is a restored Shaker community. Being a lifelong fan of Shaker furniture is what originally attracted me to this site but the story behind the village and its past inhabitants is what keeps me coming back.  That and the totally serene nature of the site.  When I am just too filled with the world today I yearn to return there for some peace and comfort. Click on the graphic to the right to go to their website. Since I have literally hundreds of photos on every aspect of the village this will not be the last time we visit Pleasant Hill on this blog.

 

With this post I am starting a new Saturday thing called “In Search of America”. I actually intended to make this a separate blog but just got too lazy to keep that up. So I will be doing it here on a weekly basis. It will primarily be about places I have visited and my search to understand what made this country what is it today. Let me know how you like it.

Rule

A mustard museum? Who would have guessed?  We recently spend a long weekend touring Madison Wisconsin and came across this oddity. It was fun to tour the store and museum. I learned more about mustard than I ever probably cared to know. :)

If you want to hear the reasons behind the museum you should read this article in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel entitled Sweet to hot, mighty mustard gives any dish flair .  Here is an excerpt to peek your curiosity:

Shakespeare wrote about mustard in four of his plays. In the Bible, a tiny mustard seed is sown to become “the greatest among herbs.”

Salsa may be the most popular condiment in the United States, and ketchup king with the under-10 set, but mustard is found in great literature and earliest recorded history. Egyptians chewed mustard seeds with meat. Romans ground seeds tableside with wine. Greeks slurped mustard-spiced stews.

With 700 million pounds consumed worldwide annually, you can bet there are more ways to enjoy mustard than simply slathered on a brat. Mustard is one of the most widely used and consumed spices in the world, especially in the Northern Hemisphere, where it’s grown.

If you are ever in the Madison Wisconsin area and have a few hours to spend visit the museum. You will never forget the experience.

Group Pictures…

July 20, 2013

Bedford Picture Merge3

For some unknown reason I have always been fascinated by group pictures such as shown in my revised header above and a larger copy here. I love looking at each individual face and trying to imagine their life story.  In studying local history such as from the picture above I have come to understand just how hard previous generations have it compared to ours. It makes me appreciate all that I have today.

We must remember that our grandparents, or maybe great grandparent, often time worked a twelve-hour day six days a week to just put bread on the table for their family. I suspect that many in the picture above due to working around limestone came down with emphysema and other such lung related problems.  Many, like their coal miner brethren, likely died of lung cancer.  There is still a very strong limestone industry just south of where I live. But I am sure that their employer now takes the necessary precautions to prevent such dangerous environments that those in this picture faced.

I am not much of a collector as such.  I do have a few “Simplify” signs strewn around my study that I have been collecting for a decade or so.  I am now on the lookout for pictures like the above.  I take digital copies where I can but I would really like to gather some of the old originals. I have had that opportunity in the past but sadly didn’t take advantage of it.

For some reason I look at group pictures and have a sense of empathy for all those who posed in front of a camera many years ago. I think that is one of the reasons I have such a passion for local histories.  During the past twelve years my wife and I have made at least one annual trek to various cities within a day or two driving distance. We spend much of our time there studying its history. I have collected many books and such and I will soon be presenting in a new blog. For those who might be interested I will be  giving you more info about this new project soon.

In order to appreciate what we have today we must understand how those who have lived before us helped shape our present world.

Cleveland 30Here we are in the final hotel of our Cleveland vacation. We are in Newark Ohio which is a little east of Columbus. We spent much of the day in more Amish country of Berlin Ohio. It claims to have the largest Amish community in the U.S. I bought a couple of framed pictures as mementos of our trip.  When we left this area to head south to I70 we found you couldn’t get there from here. Two of the three roads we tried were closed!

Cleveland 31Finally after three failed attempts we managed to find our way south and will jump on I 70 tomorrow morning for  the trip home. It was a good vacation; we certainly enjoyed the cultural aspects of it and the visit with my high school friends. We learned quite a bit about Cleveland that we didn’t know before. When we visited the historical society building yesterday we came to understand that it is critical to say you are from east Cleveland or west Cleveland, not just Cleveland. We learned that there is much ethnic diversity in Cleveland than we thought. We learned that you can’t get there from here when traveling south out of northeast Ohio.

It was an interesting vacation. We will likely be back sometime soon for another visit to our re-found friends. But the next time we will find an easier way to get from there back home :) Tomorrow I will be getting back to my usual posting about life in general…It was nice to be away but it will also be nice to get back; even for that mountain of Spring chores waiting for me…

AmishSignWe spent the day touring amish country around our friends home. There is a very large population here in northeast Ohio ( I made a terrible mistake originally here in that I said northwest instead of northeast.  Sorry about that).  Almost every house we came to had clothes out on the line and all in typical amish colors. So that made discovering which farms are amish rather easy.  That and seeing no utility lines going into the houses.  It seems that some of the families are “cheating” though; they have solar panels installed on the roofs.

AmishLaundryIt was a good leisurely day. We went to several different stores; some for the amish and some for the tourists. Our hosts bought quite a bit of bulk goods (sugar and that sort of thing) to stock up. We bought a few things to weigh the car down a little more.  If my wife buys much more I will have to rent a U-Haul trailer :)

Tomorrow we will hit the road towards home. We will likely take the State roads instead of the Interstate ones and spend an extra day.