“Great spirits have always been violently oppressed by mediocre minds.” ~Albert Einstein
There is no “right way” to have church, but there is a wrong way.
Scripture gives us very little instruction for church. We are told to “gather together” (Hebrews 10:24), we have the example of the Eucharist set by Christ (Luke 22:19), and we have a command to address the needs around us (Acts 4:32-35, 20:35, Hebrews 13:16, James 1:27), we are told to be orderly and not chaotic (1 Cor 14:40), and we are told to recognize and use the gift and talents of one another (Romans 12:3-13). That’s it, everything else is left to our own discernment. We should be free to change and adapt church to needs, times, and places. In fact, we are being foolish and obstinate not to.
SOURCE:  Yaholo Hoyt: 8 Good Reasons to Change Modern Church Service | Red Letter Christians.

  My young Romanian blogger friend Cristian Mihai stated recently that one of the reasons he blogs is […]

When you consider that the Bible was written by over 40 separate authors and compiled from thousands of manuscripts, in different languages, over hundreds of years, from a variety of locations around the world, with little collaboration, and ultimately interpreted into hundreds of translations—there are bound to be ambiguities....
Ultimately, all of these biblical issues force Christians to ask some huge questions: Is God true? Is God good? Is God relevant?
For years, Christians have resorted to using the Old vs. New Covenant as an explanation for the seemingly dramatic contradictions in God’s character. But to the average person—and Christian—this reasoning (no matter how legitimate it is) often sounds foolish and confusing and unsatisfying.....
Throughout Jesus’ ministry, He continually admonished those who were the most certain about their faith—the Pharisees. They thought they knew everything and had all the answers. Ironically, the people who were the most unsure and desperate were the ones that Jesus used to change the world. Certainty and confidence don’t necessarily equate to holiness and righteousness. We must accept the Bible in its entirety instead of avoiding the hardest parts and embrace the idea that our faith will exist within the tension of these difficult dilemmas.
SOURCE:  Stephen Mattson: Western Christianity's Biggest Problem: the Bible?! | Red Letter Christians.

Upon my recent return from the Middle East (with The Global Immersion Project), I was struck more than ever before at our Western infatuation around military aggression, violence and division. Not only are these the primary narratives we are fed through our major media outlets, they are the narratives we subconsciously embrace through the latest bestseller, box office hit or video game.  Violence, death and division have become normative. We are becoming numb to the very things that we – as ambassadors of hope and reconciliation – are to turn from as Resurrection People.  It is as though there is a strangle hold on our ability to see and participate in the stories of healing and new life.

SOURCE: Jon Huckins: Our Obsession With Violence & The Stories You’re Not Supposed to Hear | Red Letter Christians.

Everyone in America knows the catchy slogan: What Would Jesus Do (WWJD)?
Of all the Christian memorabilia donned by the church, these bracelets and T-shirts have remained at the top of the list for quite sometime. For only $5.99, you too can show the world that you follow in the footsteps of Jesus, to do what Jesus would do when faced with temptation.
The apostles too asked the question “What Would Jesus Do?” only they answered it quite differently than many Americans do. The apostles didn’t appeal to Jesus’s life to encourage believers to read their Bibles, do their devotions, or abstain from sexual temptation—all virtuous things, mind you. Instead, they pervasively and unashamedly drew upon Jesus’s nonviolent response to evil as a model for believers to follow. 
SOURCE:  What Would Jesus Do (With His Enemy)?.
LincolnHe reminds me of the man who murdered both of his parents, and then when sentence was about to be pronounced, pleaded for mercy on the grounds that he was an orphan.
Abraham Lincoln
1)  We try to share our faith before we even have any.  
I remember talking with a 13 year old girl who came to Chicago for a mission trip.  I asked her what she was doing.  She said, “I went downtown to evangelize the homeless!”  At first, I thought, “how sweet,” but then I thought, “how arrogant!”  First, why do we assume the homeless have no faith?  Second, most men and women on the streets have a lot MORE faith than you and I.  When was the last time we didn’t know where our next meal would come from?  When did we have to trust God for shelter or protection from the elements?  We may have good theology, but that is different from having faith.  Most of us don’t know what it really means to have faith in God.  Perhaps, we need to go sit at the feet of the homeless and learn from them how to have faith!
SOURCE:  Shawn Casselberry: Gandhi-Style Evangelism | Red Letter Christians.