Wild Turkey

2018-01-02_11-10-08.pngWe have a lot of wild turkeys running around our area but that is not what this post is going to be about.  Instead, it is about a Kentucky Bourbon manufacturer that I visited a few years ago while staying in downtown Louisville for a long weekend.  Wild Turkey brand bourbon is famous for being one of the strongest whiskeys around. Most are 80 proof while Wild Turkey is  101 proof!

I must admit that I am a bourbon drinker. I don’t partake of it very often but a Manhattan is my favorite cocktail. In my youth, it was an Old Fashioned but as I got older I graduated to the stronger stuff.  I’m pretty sure a large part of my genealogy is British/Scottish but I just can’t stand their version of whiskey.  I’d rather drink a bottle of Listerine than a bottle of Scotch. But I am getting a little off track here so back to the story at hand.

The Wild Turkey distillery is located in a pretty rural area of Kentucky. If it weren’t for GPS I probably would never have found the place. Once we got there the first thing I noticed was all the warehouses with small windows that housed the aging barrels of whiskey. That’s a lot of liquid corn if you ask me.  I can’t say that the distillery is high tech to any degree.  I imagine they are doing things pretty much the way they have for a hundred years.  I’m sure some of the buildings are at least that old.

One of the most ironic things about Kentucky bourbon is that you can’t buy it in many places in Kentucky. The reason for that “dry counties”, that is places where alcohol sales are prohibited. I did manage to buy a specially labeled bottle while I was there but even though it has been about 8 years since that time the bottle remains unopened!  I guess I am just letting it age a little more before I partake of it.  But given all the extremely cold weather we are having in Indiana now I just may break the label soon. 🙂

Another irony is that they say the first law enacted in Kentucky was making horse racing illegal.  Go figure!!!

I have been rambling on enough in this post.  It’s time for some pictures. As usual click on any pic to go to a larger slideshow view.

 

What Is This??

I came across this device during my visit to the Museum of the Appalachia a few months ago. I have seen a lot of historical tools of the past but never anything quite like this.  Can anyone speculate what I might have been used for?

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On The Road – Ft William, Thunderbay Canada

2017-12-06_10-44-27.pngWith this post, I am going to try to add more on-the-road trip reports here to RJsCorner. I thought this would be a good project for the 2017-18 winter months. The subject of this post is Ft. William in Thunderbay Ontario Canada which is on the north side of Lake Superior. It is in my top five historic sites I have ever visited.

Here is a little background on Ft. William from Wikipedia:

Fort William Historical Park is known as a living history site. Numerous historic buildings have been reconstructed to show the range of the post, and costumed historical interpreters recreate Fort William of the year 1816. Fort William was then not primarily a settlement, but a central transport depot within the now-defunct North West Company’s network of fur trade outposts. Due to its central role, Fort William was much larger, with more facilities than the average fur trade post. Reflecting this, Fort William Historical Park contains 42 reconstructed buildings, a reconstructed Ojibwa village, and a small farm.

Historical interpreters represent the many roles and cultures involved in the fur trade, including Scottish fur traders (people of capital), who often took Native American wives and had their families living with them; French Canadian voyageurs and workers, who also had wives from among the Natives; and native hunters and trappers. The native people in the Fort William area are predominantly Ojibwa and are represented accordingly among the interpreters.

As I have mentioned before I favor fur trading forts as opposed to the military ones. They just seem to more accurately reflect the culture of the times that they represent. The military forts emphasize the battles that took place there.

Fort William is well worth the trip for anyone who wants to understand the cultural heritage of North America and this re-creation is top notch. Here is a rather extensive menagerie of pictures of the fort.

As usual click on any pic to bring up a larger slideshow view.

 

Henry Clay Historic Site… Sigh…

Banner ISOA  I have always admired Henry Clay for being a statesmen during some tumultuous times in America and was looking forward to visiting his home during my last micro-RV trip through Kentucky and Tennessee. I don’t like giving negative reports here on RJsCorner especially when it come to important historical site but this one deserves it.

I got there at 1:05pm to tour the home and small grounds and was told I would have to wait an hour as they only gave 15 minute guided tours on the hour.,  I explained that I was deaf and wouldn’t get anything from the tour guide’s talk so could I just walk through the home and take a few pictures for my blog. The response startled me.

They said that was not possible as you have to have a guide with you at all times and they don’t allow pictures anywhere except on the 1 acre grounds.  I guess they just don’t trust anyone and don’t want any pictures. I told them they were missing out on quite a bit of advertisement by their policies but that didn’t seem to matter to them.

So, here are a couple of “allowed” pictures.  If you happen to be in the area at a few minutes before the hour and don’t mind being unable to record your visit….

 

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Perpetual Motion..

Banner ISOA  I thought for this mid-week post I would again visit the Museum of the Appalachia. This time I want to concentrate on Asa Jackson and his perpetual motion machine.  It looks like Asa spent many hours working on his machine, twiddling this and that until he got it just right.  He was convinced that he accomplished what Leonardo Da Vinci couldn’t do even if he didn’t know that story.

He was so convinced that he had something that would start an industrial revolution in the Appalachians that when the Yankee soldiers were in the area he disassembled his machine and hid it in a cave.  He didn’t want to damn yanks stealing his invention. I don’t know the story of what happened after that. It would certainly be interesting to know. But I’m pretty sure it wasn’t really a perpetual motion machine.

This is just one of thousands of stories told at the museum…

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Museum of Appalachia

 

Scan 1Banner ISOA  On my most recent trip InSearchOfAmerica I visited the Museum of Appalachia. I was not expecting too much but was blown away by what I found. It is a museum like no other I have visited. The totally unique thing about this place was that all the building and most of the antiques were identified by the person who owned them and included stories about their lives.  It is almost as if you could picture them living in the buildings and using the instruments and such.

 

I took literally a hundred photos of the place. Here are a few to entice you to visit. The museum is located in Clinton TN in the northeast corner of the State.

 

 

 

As usual click on any picture to see a larger slideshow view

 

In Case You Wondered…

Being a regular viewer of the cable TV show American Pickers I am very aware that people collect just about everything in the world. Being as how the USA is driven by consumer spending it’s not surprising that we have some of the biggest collections in the world.

In case you were wondering there is even a museum in Madison Wisconsin dedicated to a mustard collection. Who would have thought!  But it is quite a fascinating place to visit if you are in the northern hinterland.  Here is a sampling of what they have.

As usual click on any picture to see a larger slideshow view

 

A Follow Up…

Given my last post was about the “repenter” of Times Square I thought I would follow it up with a quite different version.

click on any image to see a larger slideshow version

 

Looking back on the posts this week it is interesting to see how they are all linked by common threads.  I definitely wasn’t disappointed by the crowds and revelry on Times Square that Saturday night. 🙂

Eerie Place..

On my recent road trip I came across an eerie place.  I try to avoid Interstate highways whenever possible so that means that I come across the “bones” of America so to speak. By that I mean towns and other places that have been left to the ravages of time.  I will admit that sometimes I get depressed by taking this route across America. To see towns that are now not more than a couple of occupied houses surrounded by abandoned buildings. If I understand it right that is where most of Mr. Trump’s supporters come from.  But that is a different story…

When I drove by the site just outside a small town in northern Illinois I took a double take. Up near the road was what appeared to be a hundred year old abandoned mansion. That is somewhat unusual for an area like that but what really got my attention is that it was surrounded by razor coiled wire. I hit the brakes and did a U-turn to investigate. It turns out that I had discovered the Dwight Illinois Correctional Center.

Here is what Wikipedia says about that:

Dwight Correctional Center was an Illinois Department of Corrections maximum security prison for adult females. It is located at 23813 E. 3200 North Road in Nevada Township, unincorporated Livingston County, Illinois, near Dwight. Prior to the 2011 abolition of the state death penalty,  Dwight Correctional Center housed the State of Illinois female death row…

The prison was originally opened on November 24, 1930 as the Oakdale Reformatory for Women. It sits on 100 acres of land. The facility was closed at the end of March 2013.

In the last four years time is starting to take over that abandoned facility. Weeds are growing everywhere and tree limbs are scattered on the ground. Well that is enough of a description. Let’s get on to the pictures…

Click on any picture to see an enlarged slideshow view

Waterford VA

ISOA Banner  Waterford Virginia is perhaps the most iconic town I have been through. It is located in Loudoun County about 50 miles from DC.  You won’t find any franchises or many other businesses for that matter. Nor will you find cars speeding by.

Here is a little about Waterford from Wikipedia:

After falling into disrepair in the early part of the 20th century, the Waterford Foundation was formed to help save and preserve Waterford and its history. In 1974, the Waterford Foundation helped create an innovative land preservation program in which the historic properties of Waterford are protected through open space and façade easements.

The town today is largely residential, although a number of businesses are based in the village. The Loudoun Mutual Insurance Company has been located in Waterford since 1849.

The village was listed as a Virginia Historic Landmark in 1969. Waterford and a significant portion of its surrounding countryside was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1970.  The designation was made in recognition of the town’s well-preserved 18th and 19th-century architecture and landscape. Significant buildings include the mill (circa 1750), Arch House Row (circa 1750), Camelot School (circa 1800), the Hague-Hough house, which is Waterford’s oldest house (circa 1740), and the 1882 Presbyterian church.

I’m sure you can see from the pictures below it is almost like you were somehow sent back 200 years when you tour the town.  I don’t remember exactly why we made the detour into the town during our history trip through Virginia six years ago.  But I am glad we did.

Nauvoo IL – Mormon Settlement

ISOA Banner   Nauvoo Village was one of several settlements established and then all but abandoned by Mormons due to battles with their neighbors.  The first was in Ohio, the second in Missouri, and then came Nauvoo in Illinois. This was the site that it’s founder Joseph Smith was killed and Brigham Young took over the leadership.

Mauvoo has recently been been called the “Williamsburg of the Midwest” and to some degree they deserve that title but in others they fall short. Many of the building have been restored to the 1840s but many are still in private hands. Unlike Williamsburg there are obvious places that the 21st century invades including cars parked throughout the village.

I think most, if not all the employees are of the Mormon faith so some don’t take criticisms lightly.   All being said however, I found all the people in the village to be very friendly and more than willing to accommodate my deafness.

Before I close I want to get in my “having my say” mode and talk a little about religion and Mormons particularly.  During the 1800 years or so between the beginning of Christianity and  the settlement of Nauvoo there were thousands of different version of Christianity invented. Many happened after Luther started the Protestant Reformation.  And of course there have been about 20,000 or more different version since that time.   I kind of find it ironic that there was as much ambivalence toward Mormons that there has been.  Why were they driven out of so many settlement locations before they finally reached Salt Lake City? Are they that threatening to other Christians?

I have become a “live and let live” believer in Jesus Christ.  That is I just don’t believe that any of the 35,000 version of this religion have a lock on what to believe. They are all just one person’s view of religion starting with St. Paul who had never seen Jesus and spoke little of the lessons of Jesus during his lifelong ministry. One great thing about America it that we, at least figuratively, believe in freedom of religion. Believe what you want as long as you don’t try to force your beliefs on others.

Finally getting back to Nauvoo, this village is well worth it if you find yourself in the area.

Here are some pictures from my visit.  As usual click on any one to see a larger slideshow view.

 

 

Caterpillar Tractors..

ISOA Banner   Caterpillar Tractors and such are very much a part of my search of America.  So, when I was near Peoria Illinois recently I had to stop in at their museum at the headquarters building.  What I found amazed me.  I never realized the size of much of their equipment.

Peoria is a wonderful city to tour and this exhibit is one of the prime destinations. If you are ever in the area stop by the city and this museum.

Quincy Illinois – Villa Kathrine

ISOA Banner  I will admit up front here that I didn’t spend as much time in Quincy IL as I planned. There are about a thousand historical homes in this small town but I will only feature one of them in this post.  Quincy is one of many towns along the mighty Mississippi River and of course that mean it is steeped in history. Villa Kathrine, which is the subject of today is perhaps the most unusual one.

As the sign below states it was built around 1900 and is of a Moorish/Islamic style which is just not that popular in the USA, especially now 🙂 The layout and furniture didn’t make a lot of sense to me and the central space, which I guess is essential to Islamic homes, seemed like a big waste of space.  But it did have some fantastic views of the Mississippi from several windows.

This Is In Indiana???

It is hard for many to believe that the pictures below and above were taken in Indiana. I don’t really know the history of why Indiana got the southern most tip of Lake Michigan within its boundries but it is one unique place.

I visited there years ago but these pics were from a recent uRV trip there this Spring.  From the info found at the site the prominent building in the pics used to be a very popular hotel. Notice all the car parked there in the 1930s.  It still a beautiful place worth the visit just to show you that Indiana is not all cornfields and Notre Dame football.

As usual click on any pic to see a larger slideshow view

Religion In America – Bishop Hill

This week’s Religion in America post will be about Bishop Hill in central Illinois.  Like last week’s post it is about a group who escaped a State sanctioned Lutheran system of belief in the mid 1800s. This time it is from Sweden but pretty much mirrors that of Zoar Village story from Germany.

This group settled into a communal colony where everything was held in common. But unlike most religious colonies escaping to America. Bishop Hill was more intense/fundamental than the one that they escaped from and were often in bitter opposition to many other versions of Lutheranism in America.

Here is a little about what Wikipedia says of Bishop Hill’s founder:

The village was founded in 1846 by Swedish immigrants affiliated with the Pietist movement, led by Erik Jansson. Prior to founding the Bishop Hill Colony, Jansson preached to his followers in Sweden about what he considered to be the abominations of the Lutheran Church and emphasized the doctrine that the faithful were without sin.

This story is common to many religious groups established in America. It was primarily founded around a strong and charismatic leader who chose a few particular verses in one version or another holy document to concentrate on.  But this same thing was also typical of other world religions. Lutheranism, which was founded by Martin Luther who started the Protestant Reformation about 500 years ago when he became fixated on “works” not being important to God and uttering words of faith being the primary purpose of religion.  Some say this was due to an overwhelming inferiority complex by Luther. When he found the words from St. Paul (not Jesus) “you are saved by faith, not works” it became by far the most important aspect of his version of religion.

Getting back to the story at hand in 1854 when Jansson was assassinated by a former member and six years later the communal contract ended due to mismanagement.  There are some common historic buildings left at the site but most of the dwellings in the village are now privately owned.