RetComLife #14 – You Have Got To Get Used To The Dying…

If you live in a retirement community, especially if it is also a Lifecare community, you have got to get used to the frequent presence of ambulances. Especially, if you are like me, and happen to face the delivery/pick-up entrance of the facility.

I have heard many comments from future retirees about not wanting to live with only old people. There are a few alternatives available around the country, but retirement communities are pretty much the primary option now. I am currently gathering some info about alternative places, but that will be a future post. Being childless, I don’t have a big tolerance for screaming kids, I call them “rug rats”, but that is just me. πŸ₯Έ So, I like it that they are not frequently present here.


Since this post is mainly about dying, I want to start out with a quick side story about kids to lighten things up a little. I just came back from a visit to the Carillon Historical Park in Dayton, Ohio. It is similar to Ford Museum’s Greenfield Village, but smaller and dedicated to the Wright Brothers and other such Ohio things. It’s been a while since I have made trips in the Fall, so I forgot that during weekday visits, museums of this type are often flooded with school kids. What is normally a quiet meandering visit through an exhibit turns into a frequent mini-freeway of racing kids. But, I have learned a trick to help bypass that. I visit the indoor sites during the lunch hour, as the kids are usually having lunch out on the lawn during that time. πŸ€“


Getting back to the point of this post. It seems that there is an ambulance with lights flashing at the back entrance at least a couple of times a week here. That is a constant reminder that death is simply a natural part of life. If you have trouble accepting that fact, maybe you should avoid a retirement community life until you absolutely have to.

If you have read some of my previous RetComLife posts, you probably know that I came here with a fairly low tolerance for old people. Plainly speaking, all the walkers and such initially annoyed me. Thanks to my blogging buddy Bob Lowery for helping me put a face on the people using the walkers. Thanks to him, I now put an imaginary story on every face I come across here in my retirement community. They are all people living their lives as I am, just at different stages. God loves us all, and so should I.

I have to finish this post with how I became an expert at making up stories for what I see. πŸ˜†. I went deaf in 1988 and in those days closed-captioned TV was just getting started. So, I would watch un-captioned TV with my wife and make up stories to match what the TV pictures were telling me. Many times, my storyline quickly clashed with the next screen or two, so I just made up a new story with the added visual info. It was frustrating not knowing what was being said, but making up the story did kind of take the edge off that frustration and was actually fun.